KAI – Harmony with the Universe

Kai - position of hands

The Hara (One Point) is the site of the third center of power in the body, located approximately two inches below the navel. This is the body is center of gravity. It also represents the water element. From this point flows the Yang Wei Mo, or Positive Arm Channel, which rises across the chest and extends down the inner arms to the palm and middle finger tips; and the Yin Wei Mo, or Negative Arm Channel, which also passes through the arms, but with the emphasis on veins instead of arteries. If the former (Yang Yu) is affected, the heart will be aggravated, the palms will be feverish, and the arm joints will be stiff. Headaches, fevers, and toothaches are also indicated. If the latter is not functioning properly, nervous disorders, hypertension, and epilepsy may result.

Before the student can begin to practice the actual techniques of Kuji Kiri, he must learn to keep the One Point.
By relaxing and concentrating the mind on this, even when moving about in daily life, one is able to achieve perfect balance and mental stability. This develops coordination of mind and body. The next objective is to transmit this power effectively. This involves the concept of Chi, the inner force. Chi is the spirit of the mind. Kuji Kiri teaches us to use it at will. You must control the One Point to be successful In this way, the force will flow as needed. Control of this center develops the faculty of intuition, increases the power to know oneness, and leads to an understanding of good and evil. Thus it has long been taught by many ryu as a spiritual exercise.

To form the kanji, place the hands back to back, fingers pointing down. Spread the fingers and interlock them from within. Bring the elbows down, bringing the palms together over the fingers, enclosing them within the hands. Extricate the ring and little fingers and extend them with the tips touching. The thumbs are extended and pointing toward the body.

Using the fingers as a pointer, describe the ideogram as before. Close the eyes and visualize the character. You will feel the beat of the pulse in the palms and the Chi flowing in the arms. Place the hands in the lap.

KAI – Harmony with the Universe

Hold the head erect, exhale, emptying the lungs from top to bottom.
Turn the head to look over the left shoulder and inhale, filling the lungs from bottom to top.
Turn the head to face forward and exhale.
Turn the head to look over the right shoulder and inhale as before.
Turn the head to face front and exhale.
This completes one round.
Repeat this exercise eighty-one times.
The tongue should be placed lightly against the roof of the mouth during this exercise.
On the eighty-first repetition, having faced forward and exhaled, maintain the position and inhale once more.
Imagine the breath being drawn into the lower abdomen, warming the region.
When you feet this warmth, breathe out slowly and relax the body.

The Yang Yu (Wei Mo) in the arms links the shoulders with the center of the palms after passing through the middle fingers.
Tile Dragon Cavity of the hand is located by bending the middle finger of the left hand into the palm.
Where it touches is a spot which is linked with the heart and lower abdomen by an artery passing through the left wrist.
The Tiger Cavity is found by bending the middle finger of the right hand into the palm.
Where this touches, the heart and lower abdomen are linked by a vein passing through the right wrist.
These are now charged with Chi.
The practice of Kuji Kiri is the art of transmitting this energy.

The Hara is the key to the first two centers of the body. Only at this stage can true meditation be achieved.
The first exercise, Chu, developed the power of sensory withdrawal; the second, Shen, developed the power of concentration; this, the third, develops meditative ability.

To make the distinction between this level and the preceding two, an element of duration is introduced.
Concentration can be held only for a certain length of time, depending on the individual.
At tile end of this period, it either becomes meditation, in which the gross aspects of the universe dissolve into their subtler components; or the concentration is voluntarily broken.
If the former occurs, the student enters a somnolent state, neither awake nor asleep, yet totally relaxed.

One of the results of this relaxation is the diminution of effort and the progressive disappearance of the will.
To relax is to passively withdraw into ourselves, to become one with the universe.
This is sometimes known as a state of trance contemplation.

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